The Twelve Days of Christmas with the Code!

Twelve Days of Christmas

Today is Christmas Day. Most people think of it as the end of the Christmas season, but, in a way, it is the beginning. When you hear about the Twelve Days of Christmas, you probably think about the twelve days leading up to Christmas. Actually, the twelve days begin on December 25 and end on the Epiphany in January. In old times, people would exchange presents all throughout the twelve days, hence the origin of the “Twelve Days of Christmas” song. If you haven’t managed to give all your Christmas presents, don’t be discouraged. You still have eleven days!

Here at PEPS, we want to honor the real twelve days of Christmas. We are celebrating by outlining a classic Christmas film every day. During the Breen Code era, most of the famous Christmas classics were made. Some of them focus on the Christian origins of the holiday, others are strictly secular, and some feature a combination of both elements. This Christmas, PEPS is providing you with one Christmas film for each day of the Twelve Days of Christmas. These films are Christmas presents which were lovingly prepared by Joseph I. Breen for all people to enjoy for all time. He reviewed, revised, purified, refined, guaranteed, and sealed each one. If you have watched these movies this season, I hope to share a different look at them with you. If you haven’t, I hope that I will inspire you to watch them again and relive their magic.

Merry Christmas, everyone! Click the links below to see the different entries in the “Twelve Days of Christmas with the Code!”

The First Day of Christmas: White Christmas from 1954

The Second Day of Christmas: Our Vines Have Tender Grapes from 1945

The Third Day of Christmas: The Great Rupert from 1950

The Fourth Day of Christmas: It Happened on Fifth Avenue from 1947

The Fifth Day of Christmas: The Man Who Came to Dinner from 1942

The Sixth Day of Christmas: The Bishop’s Wife from 1947

The Seventh Day of Christmas: Holiday Inn from 1942

The Eighth Day of Christmas: Show Boat from 1951

The Ninth Day of Christmas: Miracle on 34th Street from 1947

The Tenth Day of Christmas: A Holiday Affair from 1949

The Eleventh Day of Christmas: Meet Me in St. Louis from 1944

The Twelfth Day of Christmas: It’s a Wonderful Life from 1946

The Finale: The Epiphany: The Bell’s of St. Mary’s from 1945

The Encore: Russian Christmas: Balalaika from 1939

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13 thoughts on “The Twelve Days of Christmas with the Code!

  1. Pingback: Day 18 of #CleanMovieMonth: “The Bride Goes Wild” from 1948 | pure entertainment preservation society

  2. Pingback: The Encore of the Twelve Days of Christmas with the Code: “Balalaika” from 1939 | pure entertainment preservation society

  3. Pingback: The Finale of The Twelve Days of Christmas with the Code: “The Bells of St. Mary’s” from 1945 | pure entertainment preservation society

  4. Pingback: The Twelve Days of Christmas: “Meet Me in St. Louis” from 1944 | pure entertainment preservation society

  5. Pingback: The Tenth Day of Christmas: “A Holiday Affair” from 1949 | pure entertainment preservation society

  6. Pingback: The Ninth Day of Christmas: “Miracle on 34th Street” from 1947 | pure entertainment preservation society

  7. Pingback: The Eighth Day of Christmas: “Show Boat” from 1951 | pure entertainment preservation society

  8. Pingback: The Fifth Day of Christmas: “The Man Who Came To Dinner” from 1942, Sealed in Vain | pure entertainment preservation society

  9. Pingback: The Fourth Day of Christmas: “It Happened on Fifth Avenue” from 1947 | pure entertainment preservation society

  10. Pingback: The Third Day of Christmas: “The Great Rupert” from 1950 | pure entertainment preservation society

  11. Pingback: The Second Day of Christmas: “Our Vines Have Tender Grapes” from 1945 | pure entertainment preservation society

  12. Pingback: The First Day of Christmas: “White Christmas” from 1954 | pure entertainment preservation society

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