THE GREAT BREENING BLOGATHON: “Ring of Love:” An Original Movie from 1940 by Rebekah Brannan

The Great Breening Blogathon Ideas

This article was written by Rebekah Brannan, one of the founders of the Pure Entertainment Preservation Society.

Jeanette and Nelson

For the Great Breening Blogathon, I decided to write about an original idea I have for a film which could have been made in 1940 by MGM. It would have been directed by Robert Z. Leonard and produced by Hunt Stromberg. The songs I have chosen for the score were either written or arranged by Roger Quilter; Three Poor Mariners, Over the Mountains, and Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes were Old English folk songs which Quilter arranged, but Love’s Philosophy and The Spring is At the Door were his own original songs. The songs and background music would have been arranged by Herbert Stothart, who was a standard MGM musical director and arranger, and it would have been filmed in black-and-white. Now, with no further ado, let the fun begin! Enjoy the show!

The setting is France in the 1770’s. When the movie begins, the audience sees the reflection of Princess Marie (Jeanette MacDonald) in a well. She sings “The Spring is at the Door.” When she has finished singing, her maid, Lulu (Lynne Carver), arrives in the orchard and tells her that Prince Philippe (Shepperd Strudwick), is coming to see her. Marie says that she does not wish to see him. It becomes known to the audience that Prince Philippe is Marie’s fiance, whom she does not love and does not wish to marry. The maid leaves to tell Philippe that Marie does not wish to see him, but just as she leaves, he appears in the orchard. He tells her that he must return to Spain because his eldest brother, Miguel, the present ruler of Spain, has been assassinated. He promises to be back that Friday and informs her that they are to be married that Sunday. She is shocked and dismayed. Before he leaves, he gives her a cameo ring, which, he tells her, is a cameo of his great-grandmother; it has been in his family for generations, and both his brothers, Miguel and Jose, have ones exactly like it. She goes back to the castle and finds her father (Walter Kingsford) in his study. She angrily questions him about her alleged marriage that Sunday. He reminds her that she and Philippe have been betrothed since they were born, but she will not listen to his reasoning and leaves his study in anger. She goes to her room, crying with anger and frustration. A clock shows the skip from two o’clock in the afternoon to a minute to six in the evening. Marie is in a chair, crying, when the clock chimes six. She lifts her head and walks over to her dressing table, trying to compose herself. All of a sudden, she seems to get an idea and calls for Lulu. She tells her to have the stable-boy bring their best horse around to the servant’s entrance. Lulu is puzzled, but she obeys. After Lulu leaves, Marie pulls a dress out of the closet, and we fade to her wearing the plainer dress and a heavy cloak. She ties a bonnet onto her head and opens the door to her bedroom. She peaks out and surveys the empty hallway before sneaking out of her room and closing the door behind her. She is just creeping toward the staircase when she hears footsteps and ducks behind a statue. Her father appears at the top of the stairs and walks to her bedroom door. He knocks and calls her name, but when he receives no reply after several attempts, he walks away, muttering to himself. After he has entered his own room and locked the door, Marie tip-toes across the hallway and hurries down the staircase. Next, Marie is shown stepping out of a door at the back of the castle. A boy is standing nearby holding a horse by its bridle. Marie thanks him before climbing gracefully onto the horse, which walks away slowly. When Marie reaches the gate, she gets off of the horse and collects some pebbles; she throws one of them over the gate, and one of the guards walks away to investigate. She then throws another pebble in the other direction, thus causing the other guard to leave his post. She quickly walks to the gate, pushes it open slightly, and leads the horse through before closing it again. She then walks away quietly, still leading the horse. When they have gotten a good distance away from the gate, she remounts, the horse breaks into a gallop, and they disappear into the night.

We see a sign which reads Le Havre. Marie gallops up and then climbs off of her horse. She walks to a nearby stable and gives her horse to the groom. She hears men singing “Three Poor Mariners” and walks toward a bright spot within a wall of stacked crates. She creeps up to one of the stacks and peers around a crate. A group of sailors are standing in a pool of light coming from a nearby streetlamp. Charles Lasalle (Nelson Eddy) is standing in the center with one foot on a crate, leading the men in their song; two of his comrades are standing on either side of him, smiling and singing. The other men stop singing, and Charles repeats the entire song solo. At the end of the song, one of the sailors sees Marie and points her out to Charles. He widens his eyes and walks over to her, while the other men stare. Marie seems slightly embarrassed by the men’s attention. “I hope you’ll pardon the men, Mam’selle,” he says politely. “You see, we seldom have such lovely company.” Marie blushes. “Of course, Monsieur.” He smiles, and she looks down, embarrassed. She brightens slightly and adds, “I thought your song was charming.” “You did?” he replies. “Well, thank you, Mam’selle.” He looks behind her. “Are you alone?” She looks over her shoulder and then back at him. “Yes… yes, I am.” “I certainly hope you’re not lost.” “Oh, no.” “Do you live here?” “Yes… that is, no. I mean, I live and work in a little town… over there.” She gestures vaguely. “I’m a lady’s-maid. My mistress is asleep, so I rode over here.” “Rode?” he says, looking behind her again. “Where’s your horse?” “It’s in the stable over there,” she replies, pointing. “I came here to be by the ocean. I love the ocean!” “You do?” he replies. “Well, I’m glad of that. I hope you love sailors, too, because there’s one who loves you very much.” She blushes and looks down again, while he looks at her with a slightly mischievous smile. “I’d best be getting back to the house, “ Marie says suddenly. “I wouldn’t want my mistress to wake up and find me gone.” “Don’t go yet, Big Eyes,” he says. “I can get you even closer to the ocean than this. I can take you somewhere where you can see rolling beach and crashing waves without even getting sand on your shoes.” Marie looks behind her worriedly, “No, I really must go.” He grabs her arm. “Come on, Big Eyes. It will only take five minutes. I won’t take no for an answer.” She hesitates then smiles, relenting. “Alright, five minutes.” He smiles brightly. “You’ll never regret it.” He takes her hand. “Come on, Big Eyes.” They hurry away.

Fade to a tiny gazebo above a beach. Marie and Charles are sitting on a bench in the gazebo, gazing out at the sea. Charles says that Marie is very beautiful and asks her why she isn’t married. She tells him that her mistress has arranged for her to marry someone she doesn’t love since she is an orphan and must be taken care of after her death. He is surprised by this and says that ladies’ maids never have arranged marriages. She insists that she is telling him the truth then quickly changes the subject by saying how exciting his life must be, since he gets to sail to countries all over the world. He agrees but says that, more than the pyramids of Egypt, the mosques of Arabia, or the pagodas of China, he loves the little gazebo in which they’re sitting and his hometown of Le Havre. He then says she probably thinks that sounds silly, but she replies that she thinks it’s wonderful that he is so content with his life and loves something as simple as a gazebo overlooking the sea. He tells her that his mother and his father were both great singers and could have gone on the opera stage. He tells her that his father proposed to his mother in that very gazebo and that he sang a love song to her. He begins singing “Love’s Philosophy.” When he is finished, he says that his mother then sang it back to his father, and Marie sings it back to him. He clasps her hands and begins singing with her at the words “and the sunlight clasps the earth.” They sing the end together in harmony. At the end of the song, he kisses her. She quietly asks if his parents did that, too, and he replies that they did. She gets up and walks a little way away from him. He follows her and says that he loves her. She reminds him of her arranged marriage and says that she must go. He proclaims his love for her again, but she pulls away from him. She insists that she must go, but he says that he can’t lose her. She finally convinces him to let her go by promising to meet him in the gazebo at midnight the next night. Suddenly, a soldier appears and reveals that she is the princess, saying that he has come to bring her back to the castle. Charles is shocked, but he bows to her and bids her goodbye with a respectful kiss on the hand. She quietly says that she will never forget him. The soldier brings Marie to the royal carriage, where her father is waiting for her. On the way back to the palace he attempts to impress on her the folly of running away and very firmly tells her that Prince Philippe is to hear nothing of it. She says that running away was a final wild action in her single life and that she was just going to go back to the palace when he arrived. He does not believe her, but she angrily says that he has no reason to be cross because she is going to go back to the palace and marry Prince Philippe obediently. Fade out.

Next, we see Princess Marie standing at the dressing table in her bedroom, powdering her face. She looks at herself in the mirror, sighs, tosses the powder puff down, and walks out on the balcony. She sees a man come galloping up on a horse and knock on the door. When the door opens, he gives someone a large paper-wrapped package and murmurs something inaudible; the door closes, but he does not ride away. She shakes her head slightly and walks back into her room. She begins to powder her face again when her maid comes in, carrying the package the horseman delivered. She hurriedly tears away the paper and finds a large wreath of roses. There is a small envelope tied to the wreath, which she opens. It holds a note which reads: This is to ensure that you never do forget me. Charles. Her hand goes to her throat, and she drops the envelope. She hears a slight clunk when it lands on her table, so she picks it up again. Inside she finds a ring with a gold band and a piece of rose quartz in the shape of a blooming rose. Being careful not to let her maid see the ring, she hurries to her desk and writes the following words on the back of the envelope: I cannot except your flowers or your love. However, I will keep the ring to remember you by. Marie. She then slips the note back into the envelope, ties the envelope to the wreath, and wraps the paper around it again; she gives the package to her maid and instructs her to bring it back to the horseman and tell him to return it to its sender. The maid obeys and leaves with the package. Marie sighs and begins to slip the ring onto her wedding finger. As she does this, she sees the cameo ring Philippe gave her and sadly pulls open a drawer in her dressing table, from which she takes a velvet ring box which is shaped like a heart. She opens it and lovingly places Charles’s ring in it before closing it and putting it back into the drawer. She walks out onto the balcony in time to see her maid giving the package back to the horseman. He sets the package carefully into his saddlebag and rides away. As she watches him go, Marie begins singing “Over the Mountains.” At the end of the song, she presses one hand to her heart and extends the other one in the direction which the horseman, who is now out of sight, rode. We fade to the horseman knocking on a door. Charles opens it hopefully, but his face falls when the horseman gives him the package. He absentmindedly thanks the horseman and opens the package. He reads the note and looks off into the distance sadly. Fade to black.

Next, we see a maid going through a door and entering a bedroom, which is drearily lit by one lamp on a bedside table. The king is lying in the bed, and Marie is kneeling next to it, crying. He tells her weakly that she is going to be the Queen of France soon, but she tearfully denies his prediction that he will soon die. The door to the room opens and Philippe appears. He kneels next to Marie, and the king tells him that he will not live to see another day. Philippe expresses his grief, but the king weakly tells him that he and Marie must be married as soon as possible. He agrees and, with a final wish of happiness to his daughter and her future husband, the king dies. Marie buries her head in the covers and sobs, while Philippe looks at her, wanting to comfort her but not knowing how to do it. We then see a few snippets from the king’s funeral, Marie and Philippe’s marriage, and Princess Marie’s coronation. Fade to black.

Next, we fade into a shot of Marie sitting at a large desk, writing on some papers with a large feather quill. A knock sounds at the door, and she puts her quill into it’s stand before calling, “Come in.” A soldier rushes in and tells her that the murderer of Philippe’s brother, Miguel, has been found. Her eyes widen, and she asks him what evidence and information he has. He replies that the man they have found is a sailor who was sent to the king to collect money for a shipment which his captain delivered to the king. A knife which could have made the wound that killed the king and a bag of gold with the royal emblem on it were found in his belongings. The soldier who arrested the man assumed that when the king opened his treasury, the sight of all the gold was too tempting for the sailor to resist, so he killed the king, stole a bag of gold, and made his escape. Marie nods and the soldier places a death warrant on her desk, which he asks her to sign. Marie agrees that the evidence is incriminating and signs the warrant. The soldier takes the warrant and asks her if she would like to see the man; she shrugs slightly and says he may bring him in. The soldier walks out and comes back a moment later with another soldier and the accused man. He is Charles! Marie’s hand goes to her throat, and she rises with a breathless cry of “Charles!” She turns to the soldier and disbelievingly asks him if this is the accused man; he replies that he is. She breathlessly says that he must be mistaken. The soldier, looking confused, reminds her that she has signed the death warrant, so she proclaims that she wishes to revoke it. Looking shocked, the soldier replies that she may if she wishes to, but that it may hurt her reputation in court. Before she can reply, Philippe walks into the room, saying he has heard everything that has been said. Marie looks at him, her widened eyes filled with dismay and a hint of guilt. He says that he must overrule her wish to revoke the warrant; he cuts off her fervent objection by telling her he is aware that the accused man is the sailor she met in Le Havre while he was away. She looks shocked, since she thought he knew nothing of her attempt to run away shortly before their marriage. Philippe than says that if he discovered his own brother Jose had committed the murder to get the throne, he would insist that they go through with the execution because it would be his duty. He then instructs the soldiers to carry out the execution as soon as possible and leaves the room. The soldiers look at Marie for her verdict, since her husband is below her and cannot legally overrule her decree; she drops her head and mournfully tells them to follow her husband’s instructions. The main soldier bows and the groups walks out. Marie looks up suddenly and hurries after them. She calls out to Charles, and he turns, looking at her with a pained expression. The soldiers look at the queen rather disapprovingly but obediently make no move to exit the palace. Charles says that he understands what she must do, but Marie just looks after him with tears in her eyes. He nobly proclaims that even at his last supper he will be drinking to her, and, turning, begins to walk out with the soldiers. Marie, now crying, begins to sing “Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes,” and Charles turns to look at her. After singing the first verse, she breaks off, sobbing. Charles takes a step back toward her and begins singing the second verse, making Marie look up. After Charles sings the entire verse, Marie steps toward him and he toward her. Then, while the guards watch them in shock, they go back to the words “but thou thereon didst only breathe” and sing the ending together in harmony. Then, Charles turns and walks out with the guards, and Marie collapses, sobbing, into the arms of a handmaiden who is standing behind her. Fade to black.

We see a wooden platform surrounded by people. We pull back to show Marie leaning against her window, looking at the platform and sobbing. She turns away, unable to watch anymore, and walks slowly across the room, crying and twisting her handkerchief in her hands. She murmurs, “If only there were some way,” and continues pacing back and forth. After a moment, we hear the sound of a carriage driving up, and Marie, hearing it as well, goes to the window again. She looks down and sees a carriage with the royal signet of the Spanish nobility on it pull up in front of the palace. A man gets out and walks to the door. We cut to a shot of the palace lobby; the butler opens the front door to reveal the man who just arrived in the carriage. He announces that he is Don Cesar (John Barrymore), Prince Philippe’s cousin. The butler invites him inside and leads him to another door. He steps through the door and announces Don Cesar. After Philippe invites him in, the Don hands his hat and coat to the butler and enters his cousin’s study. He sits down and tells Philippe that his brother Jose is very ill. In fact, so ill that the doctor fears for his life. Philippe, who seems to be distracted by something outside the window, is upset by this news and says that if his brother dies, he will have to go back to Spain to rule, which will complicate matters because of his marriage to Marie. Seeing that Philippe is distressed, Cesar calls for a servant and tells him to bring some tea. Cesar then says he has heard that the murderer of Miguel has been apprehended. Philippe puts his head in his hands and mournfully replies that he indeed has. Don Cesar inquires as to what is distressing him so, and Philippe begins to tell him the story. We cut to Marie, who is still crying in her room. She is sitting on her large fainting couch, sobbing on its arm, when she raises her head. “I must do something,” she says, getting up. She paces for a moment and then widens her eyes, as if getting an idea, before rushing to her dressing-table and picking up her powder puff. We cut back to Philippe, who has just finished the story and tells Cesar that he thinks Marie will hate him for what he is doing and that he will never attain her forgiveness. He falls back into his chair and despairingly exclaims that this must be the worst day of his life. Cesar blandly replies that he’s sure it is, and a servant enters bearing a tray of tea. Cesar begins pouring the tea, and while he comforts Philippe, we see a close shot of him dumping something into the tea. We then cut back to a farther shot, and Cesar hands the cup to Philippe. Philippe takes a few sips and murmurs his concern again while Cesar watches him threateningly. We then cut to Marie, who has fixed her face and regained her composure considerably, standing outside of the study door. We cut back to the Don and Philippe. They turn at the sound of knocking, and Philippe asks who it is. Marie tells him it is she, and he tells her to come in. Cesar looks slightly alarmed and says that she can’t come in since they’re discussing private business. Philippe says that is nonsense and repeats his invitation for her to come in. She walks in, and Cesar looks from Marie to Philippe nervously. We show a close shot of his hand and see him pull a gun out of his pocket. We then cut back to Marie. She begins to say something but breaks off as Philippe clutches his heart and gasps in pain. Her eyes widen as she rushes to the desk and asks him what’s wrong. He breathlessly says he’s been poisoned before his eyes close and his hand falls. She turns to Don Cesar, who is now standing. She looks at Philippe and then back at Cesar. Her hand goes to her throat, and she breathlessly says to Cesar that he killed him. The Don does not try to conceal his guilt but quite plainly states that he did. He then holds up the gun and says that there is one more person he must kill. Marie looks frightened and says that he can’t kill her. Don Cesar says that he must, since he has risked everything to become king, and he can’t afford to be revealed now. As he talks, we show Marie leaning against the desk and picking up a paper weight behind her back. Just as Don Cesar aims the gun to shoot, she hits him with the paper weight. As he drops to the floor, something falls out of his coat. She leans over and picks it up. It is a cameo ring. She holds it next to the one Philippe gave to her and sees that they are identical. Her eyes widen in shock, and, turning around quickly, she calls for the guards.

We cut to the platform. The executioner is standing at one corner, the priest, Father DuValle (H. B. Warner) is standing at another, and the soldier who brought the death warrant to Marie is standing in the center. An expectant crowd is gathered around the platform, murmuring. Suddenly, the crowd parts, and Charles walks up the steps, followed by a cluster of guards. He looks resigned but brave as he walks toward the center of the platform. Father Duvalle steps toward him and asks him is there is anything he wishes. Charles asks him if he knows Marie, and the father replies that he baptized her when she was a baby and that he has been very close to her ever since. Charles asks him to send his regards to her and his wish that she will have a happy life. The father replies that he will before saying a prayer for him. He asks him if he wishes to confess, and Charles replies that he cannot since he isn’t guilty. The father replies that that is between him and God, blesses him, and steps to the back of the platform. Charles turns to the soldier and nods. Just as the executioner steps forward, an authoritative voice calls “Stop!” Everyone turns and sees Marie standing at the edge of the platform. A murmur spreads through the crowd, and Charles looks at her with a pained and longing expression. Marie tells them that a mistake has been made. A group of guards leading Don Cesar, who has regained consciousness, steps onto the platform. Marie proclaims that Don Cesar is the real murderer. She produces the ring and tells them that he stabbed Miguel, has been slowly poisoning Jose, and killed her husband just a few minutes before. A gasp and more murmuring spreads through the crowd as Don Cesar is led to the middle of the platform. Charles walks to Marie and takes her hand, gazing at her with an expression that says more than words could.

Fade to a huge cathedral surrounded by an eager crowd. Charles and Marie step out, dressed in wedding clothes, and the crowd breaks into cheers. As the joyful surveyors cheer and clap, Marie and Charles begin singing “Love’s Philosophy” in harmony, beginning at the words “And the sunlight clasps the earth.” When they finish the song they turn, gaze into each other’s eyes for a moment, and kiss. Fade out.

mgm-the-end.jpg

The entire text, with reprises, modifications, and repeats of the songs in this film:

The Spring Is At The Door

Princess Marie:

The Spring is at the door:

She bears a golden store,

Her maund with yellow daffodils runneth o’er

Her rosy feet are bare,

The wind is in her hair,

And O her eyes are April eyes, very fair.

After her footsteps follow

The mullein and the mallow;

She scatters golden powder on the sallow.

She brings the crocus white,

And golden aconite:

She brings desire and doubting and delight.

The Spring is at the door:

She bears a golden store,

Her maund with yellow daffodils runneth o’er

Her rosy feet are bare,

The wind is in her hair,

And O her eyes are April eyes, very fair.

 

Three Poor Mariners

A Group of Sailors:

So we’ll go dance the round, the round, the round,

So we’ll go dance the round,

And he that is a bully, bully boy

Come pledge me on the ground, the ground, the ground,

Come pledge me on the ground.

Charles Lasalle:

O we be three poor Mariners,

Newly come from the seas,

We spend our lives in jeopardy

While others live at ease.

So we’ll go dance the round, the round, the round,

So we’ll go dance the round,

And he that is a bully, bully boy

Come pledge me on the ground, the ground, the ground.

We care not for those martial men

That do our states disdain,

But we care for those merchant men

Who do our states maintain.

So we’ll go dance the round, the round, the round,

So we’ll go dance the round,

And he that is a bully, bully boy

Come pledge me on the ground, the ground, the ground,

Come pledge me on the ground.

 

Love’s Philosophy

Charles Lasalle:

The fountains mingle with the river

And the rivers with the ocean;

The winds of Heav’n mix for ever

With a sweet emotion.

Nothing in the world is single;

All things, by a law divine,

In one another’s being mingle,

Why not I with thine, not I with thine?

See, the mountains kiss high Heav’n,

And the waves clasp on another,

No sister flower would be forgiv’n

If it disdained its brother.

And the sunlight clasps the earth,

and the moonbeams kiss the sea,

What are all these kissings worth,

If thou, if thou kiss not me?

Princess Marie:

The fountains mingle with the river

And the rivers with the ocean;

The winds of Heav’n mix for ever

With a sweet emotion.

Nothing in the world is single;

All things, by a law divine,

In one another’s being mingle,

Why not I with thine, not I, with thine?

See, the mountains kiss high Heav’n,

And the waves clasp on another,

No sister flower would be forgiv’n

If it disdained its brother.

Together in Harmony:

And the sunlight clasps the earth,

and the moonbeams kiss the sea,

What are all these kissings worth,

If thou, if thou kiss not me?

Reprise

Together in Harmony:

And the sunlight clasps the earth,

And the moonbeams kiss the sea,

What are all these kissings worth,

If thou, if thou kiss not me?

 

Over the Mountains

Princess Marie:

Over the mountains

And over the waves,

Under the fountains

And under the graves,

Under floods that are deepest

Which Neptune obey,

Over rocks that are steepest,

Love will find out the way.

Where there is no place

For the glowworm to lie,

Where there is no space

For receipt of a fly:

Where the midge dare not venture

Lest herself fast she lay,

If Love come he will enter

And will find out the way.

Some think to lose him

Or have him confined.

Some so suppose him,

Poor thing, to be blind;

But if ne’er so close ye wall him,

Do the best that ye may,

Blind Love, if so ye call him,

Soon will find out his way.

You may train the eagle

To stoop to your fist

Or you may inveigle

The phoenix of the East.

The lioness you may move her

To get o’er her prey,

But you’ll ne’er stop a lover,

Love shall find out the way.

 

Drink To Me Only With Thine Eyes

Princess Marie:

Drink to me only with thine eyes,

And I will pledge with mine;

Or leave a kiss within the cup

And I’ll not ask for wine.

The thirst that from the soul doth rise

Doth ask a drink divine;

But might I of Jove’s nectar sup,

I would not change for thine.

Charles Lasalle:

I sent thee late a rosy wreath, not so much honouring thee,

As giving it a hope that there

It could not withered be.

But thou thereon didst only breathe

And sent’st it back to me;

Since when it grows, and smells, I swear, not of itself but thee.

Together in Harmony:

But {thou/I} thereon didst only breathe

And sent’st it back to {thee/me};

Since when it grows, and smells, {I/you} swear, not of itself but {thee/me}.

 

Cast List:

Cast List Jeanette MacDonald  Princess Marie: An independent princess who runs away from the castle to escape marrying a Spanish prince and falls in love with a handsome sailor; played by Jeanette MacDonald.

Cast List Nelson Eddy  Charles Lasalle: A handsome sailor who meets and falls in love with Princess Marie shortly before her marriage and is later accused of murdering her husband’s brother, the king of Spain; played by Nelson Eddy.

Cast List Shepperd Strudwick  Prince Philippe: Princess Marie’s betrothed who is murdered shortly after his marriage to her; played by Shepperd Strudwick.

Cast List Walter Kingsford  The King of France: Marie’s kind but practical father, who forces his daughter to marry Prince Philippe and dies of a weak heart shortly before their marriage; played by Walter Kingsford.

Cast List John Barrymore  Don Cesar: Prince Philippe’s scheming cousin who kills Philippe and Miguel so that he will have the throne, but is executed for the crimes, despite his attempt to frame Charles; played by John Barrymore.

Cast List H. B. Warner  Father DuValle: A kind priest who has been Marie’s friend and adviser for a long time and speaks to Charles before he is to be executed for Miguel’s murder; played by H. B. Warner.

Cast List Lynne Carver  Lulu: Princess Marie’s maid; played by Lynne Carver

 

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6 thoughts on “THE GREAT BREENING BLOGATHON: “Ring of Love:” An Original Movie from 1940 by Rebekah Brannan

  1. Pingback: Ring the Assembly Bell! Here Comes the Singing Sweethearts Blogathon! | pure entertainment preservation society

  2. Thank you for such a wonderful concept. MacDonald and Eddy were favorites of my mom. I think they didn’t make enough films together – we could have used several more, especially during the 40’s. This would have made a nice addition to the canon.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: EXTRA: “The Great Breening Blogathon!” | pure entertainment preservation society

  4. Pingback: THE GREAT BREENING BLOGATHON: DAY 1! | pure entertainment preservation society

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