Letters to the Editor

Many people may feel that there is something wrong with Hollywood but do not know what the real problem is. Anyone who is reading this undoubtedly knows our explanation for the problem. We have written little, however, about what can be done to evoke change and get an “Old Deal.” The most vital step in our mission is to reach as many Americans as possible. We hope that thousands of Americans will subscribe to our gossip column and help us affect a change in the entertainment industry. Please continue reading this article, since it describes a valuable way to spread the news about the Code of 2017: the letter to the editor.

The newspaper, although challenged by the internet, is a useful source for reaching people. Most newspapers accept online submissions for letters to the editor. Large newspapers receive many letters, so there is a smaller chance that your letter will be published. I believe that persistence is the key. Continue to send your letter to the editor, since you will have a better chance of being noticed. Also, all newspapers have web sites which feature the same information as their physical alternatives, so even more people can be reached through them.

If you want to write a letter to the editor, you must first decide which newspapers you want to contact. Some will not print letters from people outside their circulation, but others may consider outside epistles. We are contacting the major newspapers in the nation, as well as the local ones in our area. Although major newspapers such as USA Today and the Los Angeles Times reach more people, local newspapers are valuable, as well, since many people read nothing but the local news.

Most papers have word limit for the letters they accept. Some accept 150 words, others 200, and still others 500. It is difficult to condense such a large topic into 150 words, but it can be done. The important thing is to grab the reader’s attention, present the most important facts, and invite the reader to look at this gossip column, including the web address. More facts can be put into the 500 word letter, so it may create a bigger impact. A good letter, though, can stimulate the reader’s interest in two short paragraphs.

Below is our short letter to the editor, which is 155 words not counting our names.

Dear Citizens of America,

What’s wrong with the modern American cinema? Out of 2015’s top twenty films, why were twelve rated R, six rated PG-13, and none rated G? The reason is, films are rated but not censored. It’s hard to believe there was a time when everyone could see every film. A look at past films, however, reassures one’s faith in proper entertainment.

One may be surprised that films in the 20’s and early 30’s contained immoral elements similar to those in the 1960’s. Why were films so wholesome only slightly later? The answer is simple: from 1934 to 1954 Joseph Breen strictly enforced the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930. But what is this Code, and how did it produce films which adhere to strong moral principles? Visit https://pureentertainmentpreservationsociety.wordpress.com to learn the fascinating story of loose early films, Hollywood’s Golden Age, its tragic demize, and the hope it gives for the future!

Hopefully,

Tiffany and Rebekah Brannan

Some newspapers accept longer letter than our short one but do not allow ones as lengthy as our long letter. I have included a 400 word letter, which is below:

Dear Citizens of America,

What’s wrong with the modern American cinema? Out of 2015’s top twenty films, why were twelve rated R, six rated PG-13, and none rated G? The reason is, films are rated but not censored. It’s hard to believe there was a time when everyone could see every film. A look at past films, however, reassures one’s faith in proper entertainmentSurprisingly, films in the 20’s and early 30’s contained immoral elements similar to those in the 1960’s. Why were films so wholesome only slightly later? The answer is simple: from 1934 to 1954 Joseph Breen strictly enforced the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930. But what is this Code, and how did it produce films which adhere to strong moral principles? Read on to learn about loose early films, Hollywood’s Golden Age, its tragic demize, and the hope it gives for the future!

In 1915 the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment excludes motion pictures. Individual states immediately began censorship. Hollywood realized the need for self-censorship, since different states were making various cuts to films, and government censorship was being threatened. All attempts at self-censorship failed until Quigley and Father Lord wrote the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930 (Hays Code). Hollywood officially adopted it, but the administrators lacked authority to enforce it. In 1934 an amendment was passed, requiring all films to be approval by the Production Code Administration before release. Breen became the director, and the Code was strictly enforced. When Breen retired and Geoffrey Shurlock replaced him, the Code and the cinema suffered. Shurlock lacked Breen’s strength and succumbed to the directors’ pressure. In 1968 Shurlock retired, the rating system replaced the Code, and Hollywood’s Golden Age was over.

For two decades Hollywood was conscious of its strong moral influence. Everyone could go to the theater without concerns. Filmmakers think obscenity sells tickets, but audiences will accept anything from Hollywood, adapting their life-styles accordingly. With films getting worse annually and American immorality increasing rapidly, something must be done. If America is going to change, Hollywood must change first. The taboo subjects in the Code still exist, still are wrong, and still corrupt audiences. What can Americans do to invoke change? Visit https://pureentertainmentpreservationsociety.wordpress.com to help us bring back the Code, clean up films, and make America again, as our founding-fathers named it, “a city on a hill!”

Hopefully,

Tiffany and Rebekah Brannan

Below is our long letter to the editor, which is 491 words not counting our names.

Dear Citizens of America,

What’s wrong with the modern American cinema? Out of 2015’s top twenty films, why were twelve rated R, six rated PG-13, and none rated G? The reason is, films are rated but not censored. It’s hard to believe there was a time when everyone could see every film. A look at past films, however, reassures one’s faith in proper entertainment. One may be surprised that films in the 20’s and early 30’s contained immoral elements similar to those in the 1960’s. Why were films so wholesome only slightly later? The answer is simple: from 1934 to 1954 Joseph Breen strictly enforced the Motion Picture Production Code of 1930. But what is this Code, and how did it produce films which adhere to strong moral principles? Read on to learn the fascinating story of loose early films, Hollywood’s Golden Age, its tragic demize, and the hope it gives for the future!

In 1915 the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment does not apply to motion pictures. Individual states immediately erected film censors. Hollywood realized the need for self-censorship, since different states were making various cuts to its films, and government censorship was being threatened. Although several attempts at self-censorship were made, all attempts failed until 1930, when Martin Quigley and Father Daniel A. Lord wrote the Motion Picture Production Code, commonly called the Hays Code. Hollywood officially adopted it, but the administrators lacked the authority to enforce it. In 1934 an amendment was written which stated that all films required approval by the Production Code Administration for release. Joseph Breen became the director, and the Code was strictly enforced. When Breen retired and Geoffrey Shurlock replaced him, the Code and the cinema began to die. Shurlock lacked Breen’s strength and succumbed to the pressure from directors. In 1968 Shurlock retired, the Code was replaced with the rating system, and Hollywood’s Golden Age was over.

For two golden decades Hollywood was conscious of morality and its strong influence on the lives of the consumers, who naively and trustingly go to the theater to be impacted, brain-washed, and frequently corrupted. Everyone could go to the theater without qualms or reservations about the content. Filmmakers think that obscenity and prurience sells tickets. During the Code years, it was not the audiences, but the filmmakers who complained about the strict moral rules. Audiences will accept anything Hollywood gives them and will adapt their life-styles accordingly. With films getting worse every year and the immorality in America rising to terrifying heights, something must be done to regain order. If America is going to change, Hollywood must change first. The taboo subjects listed in the Code still exist, still are wrong, and still corrupt audiences. What can Americans do to invoke change? Visit https://pureentertainmentpreservationsociety.wordpress.com  to help us bring back the Code, clean up the film industry, and make America once again, as our founding-fathers named it, “a city on a hill!”

Hopefully,

Tiffany and Rebekah Brannan

We submit these as examples for those of you who want to write letters to the editor. You may use them as guides for writing your own letters, or you may copy them directly and call them your own. You have our permission. The important thing is to reach as many people as possible.

If you submit a letter to the editor of a newspaper, please comment to this article and tell us about it. It is especially important to tell us what newspapers agree to publish your letters. Thus, we will be able to track our progress.

Exercises freedom of speech and freedom of the press by writing a letter to the editor to get an “Old Deal!”

Follow us to bring back the Code and save the arts in America!

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7 thoughts on “Letters to the Editor

  1. We sent all the letters again today. The Town Crier responded and said that our short letter will be published in this week’s edition of the paper, which will come out tomorrow. We will attach an image of the letter in the paper to this article.

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  2. We have submitted the short letter to the South Town Star and the Chicago Tribune. We sent both the long and short letters to the New York Post, since it did not specify the preferred length. Please join us in our attempts in contacting the nation!

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  3. Yesterday we sent the short letter to the Idyllwild Town Crier, which is our local weekly paper, the Desert Sun, and the Los Angeles Times. We submitted it again to the Sun and the Times today, as we will every day this week. Today we submitted the long letter to USA Today and to the Desert Sun as a Valley Voice guest column. We will also send these multiple times throughout the week. Please join us!

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